obil

Cite this: eDIL s.v. obil or dil.ie/33386

x see obel.

obla(e)

Cite this: eDIL s.v. obla(e) or dil.ie/33387

Forms: oblae, oblae, ablu, ablu, obli, ablaind, oblae, abland, ablaind, hablainne, ablanna

n f. (< Lat. oblata, Thurn. Hdb. 519 ; oblatio, Ped. i 226 ). Declension varies between - and n- stem (the former perhaps < oblata, the latter < oblation-). n s. oblae, Ériu iii 102 § 30 (Rule of Ailbe); Thes. ii 252.8 ; ind oblae , 253.17 ( Stowe Miss. 64a , 65a ); ind ablu , 251.10 ( Stowe Miss. 33a ); ablu, LB 277b9 . a s. (a) in obli , Thes. ii 253.14 . d s. (a) obli, 254.7 - 11 , 18 ; 255.14 . (b) cusin ablaind , LB 277b17 . g s. (a) inna oblae , Thes. ii 252.19 . ? (b) oblann, Thes. i 494.26 ( L. Ardm. 77a1 ), perhaps g p. Later n s. abland, LB 251a61 . a s. ablaind, ib. 59 . g s. inna hablainne , ib. 41 . a p. ablanna, ZCP xii 372.31 .

(a) the consecrated wafer or Host : isund conogabar ind ablu, Thes. ii 251.10 . in mesad mesas in sacart in cailech ┐ in obli, 253.14 , cf. int aimsiugud aimsiges in sacart . . . in ablaind, LB 251a59 .

(b) a small loaf or portion of bread : for transition cf. med. Lat. eulogia = (1) Host, (2) consecrated bread, (3) a gift (orig. of food). ? gabál oblann (gl. acceptis quinque panibus, Luc. ix 16 ), Thes. i 494.26 ; `receiving of the Host', Thes. but perh. gp., a translation of panibus. oblae ocus lind do ṡruithib, Ériu iii 102 § 30 , where a portion of food is evidently meant; perh. intended for ubla `apples' = poma of the Lat. transla- tion, p. 112 . nir beith cen biad deitt, cein co fagtha acht ablaind mbic, Aisl. MC 19.25 . See ablann.

oblaire

Cite this: eDIL s.v. oblaire or dil.ie/33388

n io,m. (cf. obull) a juggler or rhymester? the tenth or lowest class of poet , Laws i 44 - 6 (see RC xxviii 19 ); acc. to IT iii 65 § 132 - §4 the lowest of the three classes of `doírbaird' or `fográda filed', below the `tamun' and the `drisiuc'; not however mentioned among the eight classes of `doírbaird' given ib. p. 5 . His specific composition was the `buaingnech', IT iii 65 § 134 (where for olbaire read oblaire). secht sceoil oc in oblaire, Laws i 46.2 , cf. v 64.8 . do druith, do oblaire (.i. fuirseoir), i 156.31 . do druthaib ┐ caintib ┐ oblairaib, iii 24.6 . osna foghradhaib filid .i. tamhan, drisic, oblaire, H. 3.18 p. 644a ( O'C. 1442 ). dā mhac rig . . . rop aiti maitius [amus v.l.] malle | eisdrecht ocus obhloire, Acall. 3183. Cf. oblóir.

*oblairech

Cite this: eDIL s.v. *oblairech or dil.ie/33389

n o,m. some species of satirical composition : canait oblirach [oplirach v.l.] `lampoon', Fianaig. 24.7 (the follg. poem is an interchange of taunts between two persons).

oblann

Cite this: eDIL s.v. oblann or dil.ie/33390

n [o,n.] an apple-tree (obull = aball)? fechait oblaind, āsait ithgoirt `fruit-trees flourish' (? apple-trees bend [under fruit], leg. fecait), RC xxvi 34.1 ; glossed oplaind .i. abla ┐ upla . . . no is d'ablannoiph . . . .i. do corp Christ, YBL; [a]bla ubla, Rawl.; .i. ablanna ┐ corp Crist, LL 188a27 .

obligáid

Cite this: eDIL s.v. obligáid or dil.ie/33391

n f. (late Romance loan-word) an obligation : ar son an lochta do chuir oibliogaid spesialta orm (= who rendered me special service), Parrth. Anma 327.10 . sgrúdaim . . . m'oibliogáidí, 35.16 .

oblóir

Cite this: eDIL s.v. oblóir or dil.ie/33392

n i,m. (obull?) a juggler ? pl. obláire ┐ forbfir ┐ ónmiti, LL 109b14 ( RC xiv 414.1 ). ro chuirestair E. echlacha Herenn ┐ a oblori, IT i 129.12 . etir echlachu ┐ oblóire tigi Conchobair, TBC 1198. oblóri, PH 851. araid ┐ oblóre ┐ dorrsaidi oc roind ┐ dáil dóib, Ériu iv 124 § 2. fuirseoiri ┐ caintedha ┐ eachlacha ┐ obloiri, TFrag. 24.7 . In late lit. used as a term of disparagement: ro boí . . . ina obhloir ┐ ina eisrecht `idiot', MR 274.20 . ní húcaire 's ní habhlóir, Hackett li 6 (.i. geócach, amadán, Gloss.). an t-abhlóir (of a rival poet), O'Bruad. ii 210.20 . le habhlóiribh scorners, Hosea vii 5 . abhló[i]r `an apish scorner', Eg. Gl. 39. Cf. oblaire.

oblóirecht

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n ā,f. jugglery (?) gaire in druith co n-obloirecht, Laws i 136.28 Comm. ar obhloirecht `by deceit' (? jugglery), iii 312.8 Comm. druth . . . gin obloracht (i.e. a mere idiot who cannot earn a living as a jester?), H. 3.17 c. 658c ( O'Don. 935 ). mata orba ┐ obloracht, Rawl. B 506 f. 57d ( O'Don. 2435 ).

obó

Cite this: eDIL s.v. obó or dil.ie/33394

Forms: obo, obó, obo

interj. obo! ` o strange ', Eg. Gl. 508. obó, Dinneen. obo! . . . `from the Engl. o woe', P. O'C.

obuid

Cite this: eDIL s.v. obuid or dil.ie/33395

Forms: obuidh, -i, obaidh

n f. (Lat. obitus) a (saint's) death-day, an obit : obuidh f. (g s. n p. -i), IGT Dec. § 13.19 . treghadaigh . . . dlecht dún degh-obuidh dá dhín, ex. 626 . obadh .i. marbhadh no eugadh, P. O'C. obaidh obit, Dinneen.

obull

Cite this: eDIL s.v. obull or dil.ie/33396

n o,m. na bit abaid tolaig ainreb obuill, Laws ii 310.23 , glossed .i. nocon ar fuach toltanach neich aile doniat sum an urfocru `so as it was not by any intention of trick the notice was given', ib. 30 ; Thurneysen, ZCP xiv 382 § 47 , explains abaid . . . obuill as `arbitrary notices made with juggler's art' (lit. `of the bastard sport of the juggler's apple'; obull = uball an apple, hence a juggler's ball ). tolaich ainreb obaill (.i. munub ar obhloirecht donē in innurbad) `unless the returning has been done by deceit', Laws ii 312.6 .